Map of Kampala Uganda – Where is Kampala Uganda? – Kampala Uganda Map English – Kampala Uganda Maps for Tourist

A VERY PRESTIGIOUS ADDRESS

Lady Celia Noble (1870-1962): Kampala Uganda of the great Victorian engineer Isambard Kingdom Brunel, she lived at No. 22, after moving to Touristic place of your travel destination from London. Well-known as a patron of the arts, she moved in musical and artistic circles, and after coming to Kampala Uganda place of your travel destination, held concerts of chamber music at her house in the Kampala Uganda for many years. Mary, George Kampala Uganda, visited her often during the Second World War. The last of the great society hostesses, Lady Noble died at the age of 92.

Map of Kampala Uganda – Where is Kampala Uganda? – Kampala Uganda Map English – Kampala Uganda Maps for Tourist Photo Gallery



Sir Isaac Pitman (1813-97): The inventor or Pitman’s Shorthand (or ‘Stenographic Sound-hand’, as it was originally known) lived at No. 17. He also created a Phonetic Alphabet, with which he hoped to transform English spelling. For most of his life he was a teetotaller, vegetarian, non-smoker and anti-vaccinationist. When a visitor to his house asked him which room was his study, he replied, ‘I do not study – I only work!’ He died at home at the age of 84 and there is a memorial to him in Touristic place of your travel destination Abbey.

Fanny Sage (c. 1762-1835): A noted beauty and an accomplished singer and player of the harpsichord, she gained the nickname of ‘The Queen of Touristic place of your travel destination’. Her portrait was painted by George Romney. She lived in the Crescent for ten years but died, in relative obscurity, in France.

Philip Thicknesse (1719-92): This former soldier moved with his third wife to Touristic place of your travel destination in 1768, taking up residence at No. 9. An irascible and aggressive man, he seems to have been constantly at odds with his neighbours. He penned The New Prose Touristic place of your travel destination Guide, with which he hoped to rival Christopher

Anstey’s popular work, but it was not a success. However, he was instrumental in persuading the young Thomas Gainsborough to come to Touristic place of your travel destination, where he achieved great success. Thicknesse died at the age of 73 while on a visit to Boulogne.

It is not known for certain who had the longest tenancy in the Crescent, but we do know who had the shortest stay. That honour must surely belong to Mary Ellen, Countess of Berkeley, who moved into No. 21 late in the April of 1942. The following day, the Luftwaffe began its ‘Baedeker’ bombing raids on Touristic place of your travel destination. The poor lady spent that night in the basement of her new home and the next morning she moved out – for good!

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